29 December 2005 · 4 comments · Categories: Uncategorized

Of course, that may be a misleading title. Evidence is still being adduced as to whether he has had a first thought . . .

We are lucky in Delaware. Our Congressional delegation, Democrat and Republican, is composed of pretty decent guys. If you want to meet them, be at the Wilmington train station at about 7:30 a. m. almost any morning; they commute on the early Metroliner to Washington. Heck, I used to run into Senator Carper, when he was still Governor, at PTA meetings. His son attends the same school district as mine, and he would show up, not as Governor, but as father.

Pennsylvania, on the other hand, has Rick Santorum (faithful lapdog for Bush). Mr. Santorum lives in Virginia (unlike the Delaware delegation) and homeschools his children, while accepting payments from Pennsylvania for said home-schooling.

Mr. Santorum has been a vocal supporter of the intellectually bankrupt concept of Intelligent Design Creationism, to the extent of serving on the board or the Thomas More Law Center, which handled the defense of the now-deposed Creationists on the Dover, Pa., School Board.

Indeed,

In 2002, Santorum said in a Washington Times op-ed article that intelligent design “is a legitimate scientific theory that should be taught in science classes.”

(Of course, it’s not legitimate, it’s not scientific, and it’s not a theory. It’s a smokescreen, but that’s another story.)

But now he’s blown it all off, saying ” he meant that teachers should have the freedom to mention intelligent design as part of the evolution debate — not be required to do so. He added that his position has not changed.” (See link above)

Now, saying teachers should be allowed to mention something is not the same thing as saying they should teach it. His position may not have changed, but his public statements sure as heck have.

Santorum’s wiggling illustrates the both the problems and the tactics of the proponents of Intelligent Design Creationism.

Their goal is not advancing science. Their goal is establishing religion–their religion–as the Established Church of the United States.

Consequently, their statements are not bound by any kind of provable facts, so they can say whatever the heck seems convenient in the moment. Kind of like our President.

I almost wish I still lived in Pennsylvania so I could vote against him, but, then, again, I’m glad I live in Delaware where, so far at least, I do not have to worry about Creationists in my Congressional Delegation.

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4 Comments

  1. So under this Dover decision, does a biology teacher have the freedom to mention “intelligent design” in class?

  2. As I interpret the ruling, teachers would be forbidden from mentioning Intelligent Design as a scientific theory. They would not be forbidden from mentioning it as a philosophical theory.

    The science teachers, according to the citations in the ruling, were uniformly opposed to the Creationism disclaimer and agreed to it only to get the textbook they wanted approved by the fanatics on the schoolboard.

  3. i was home schooled and it is quite satisfactory when providing basic education’;”

  4. i was home schooled when i was still very young and i have to stay that it is also a great way to educate your kids `,”