Still under 300k.

Jobless claims declined by 10,000 to 258,000 in the week ended Dec. 3, a report from the Labor Department showed Thursday.

(snip)

Claims have stayed below the 300,000 level for 92 consecutive weeks, the longest stretch since 1970 and typically consistent with an improving job market. . . .

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits dropped by 79,000 to 2.01 million in the week ended Nov. 26. The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits declined to 1.4 percent from 1.5 percent.

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In related news, Josh Marshall looks at developments.

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01 December 2016 · Comments Off on Cabinet of Horrors · Categories: Mammon, Political Economy

Will Bunch opens the door and takes a peek.

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01 December 2016 · Comments Off on Nothing To Do, Nowhere To Go · Categories: Political Economy

Sill under 300k (emphasis added).

Jobless claims increased by 17,000 to 268,000 in the week that ended Nov. 26 and included Thanksgiving, Labor Department figures showed Thursday in Washington.

(snip)

Jobless claims have been below 300,000 for 91 straight weeks — the longest streak since 1970 and a level typical for a healthy labor market. At the same time, other factors that have pushed claims down in recent years, including cuts in the duration of benefits and changes to claim-filing technology.

Estimates in the Bloomberg survey ranged from 245,000 to 265,000. The prior week’s reading was unrevised at 251,000.

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits increased by 38,000 to 2.08 million in the week ended Nov. 19.

Wait six months. I predict the rate will Trumple.

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MIA

01 December 2016 · Comments Off on MIA · Categories: Health Care, Political Economy, Republican Hypocrisy

Remember all those teabaggers who demonstrated against the Affordable Care Act carrying signs that said, “Hands off my Medicare”?

Where are they now?

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27 November 2016 · Comments Off on Those Who Forget History . . . . · Categories: Political Economy, Political Theatre

Dick Polman has had it with the lionizing of Fidel Castro. Even granting, as I do, that the government he overthrew was rampant with corruption and Havana was a playground run by the American mafia, Castro has many faults and, especially in the early years, was quite the despot.

A snippet:

The amnesiacs and ahistorical romanticizers should study the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. That’s when Fidel urged Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to consider launching a first nuclear strike on the eastern seaboard of the United States. In a letter to Krushchev on Oct. 26, he said that if the Americans try to invade the island, “that would be the moment to eliminate this danger forever, in an act of the most legitimate self-defense. However harsh and terrible the solution, there would be no other.” (My italics).

That advice was too much even for Khrushchev, who subsequently told Fidel in writing that government leaders can’t allow themselves to be “swept away by the popular feelings of hot-headed elements…If we had refused a reasonable arrangement with the U.S., a war would have left millions of dead and survivors would have blamed their leaders.”

Afterthought:

I remember the Cuban missile crisis, the press conferences on television, the pictures of missile carriers with their missiles at rest, the contemplation of death.

Yes, even kids understand death.

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The Las Vegas Sun takes a look at Donald Trump’s promise to bring back manufacturing jobs and concludes that’s it more flim-flam. A nugget:

Wait until Trump tries to come through on one of his central promises: to bring back millions of high-paying manufacturing jobs to the U.S.

There is no shortage of economic experts who say it’s a fantasy.

Why?

Because U.S. manufacturers already are producing a lot of goods. They’re just doing it with fewer people due to automation and other technological advancements in manufacturing processes.

Follow the link for much, much more.

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24 November 2016 · Comments Off on Nothing To Do, Nowhere To Go · Categories: Political Economy

Still well under 300k, despite Bloomberg’s scary headline (follow the link to see it).

Jobless claims rose by 18,000 to 251,000 in the period ended Nov. 19, a Labor Department report showed Wednesday.

(snip)

The four-week average of claims, a less-volatile measure than the weekly figure, declined to 251,000 — the lowest since the first week of October — from 253,000 in the prior week.

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits climbed by 60,000 to 2.04 million in the week ended Nov. 12. The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits ticked up to 1.5 percent from 1.4 percent. These data are reported with a one-week lag.

Wait six months. The unemployment rate will Trumple.

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17 November 2016 · Comments Off on Nothing To Do, Nowhere To Go · Categories: Political Economy

Still not bad.

Jobless claims dropped by 19,000 to 235,000 in the week ended Nov. 12, which included the Veterans Day holiday, a Labor Department report showed Thursday in Washington.

(snip)

The four-week average of claims, a less-volatile measure than the weekly figure, declined to 253,500 from 260,000 in the prior week.

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits dropped by 66,000 to 1.98 million in the week ended Nov. 5. The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits fell to 1.4 percent from 1.5 percent. These data are reported with a one-week lag.

Wait six months.

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16 November 2016 · Comments Off on “Laboratories of Democracy” · Categories: Political Economy, Political Theatre

It is sometimes said that, in the U. S., states are the laboratories of democracy. Peter St. Onge suggests that, if that’s the case, take a look at North Carolina.

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10 November 2016 · Comments Off on Nothing To Do, Nowhere To Go · Categories: Political Economy, Republican Hypocrisy

Still not bad.

Jobless claims fell by 11,000 to 254,000 in the week ended Nov. 5, a Labor Department report showed Thursday in Washington.

(snip)

The four-week average of claims, a less-volatile measure than the weekly figure, ticked up to 259,750 from 258,000 in the prior week.

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits rose by 18,000 to 2.04 million in the week ended Oct. 29, while the four-week average dropped by 2,250. The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits held at 1.5 percent.

Do not expect this trend to continue once voodoo economics again casts its spell.

E. J. Dionne:  Forgive me for noting that conservatives believe the rich will work harder if we give them more, and the poor will work harder if we give them less.

Image via Job’s Anger.

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08 November 2016 · Comments Off on Vote · Categories: Political Economy

My Daddy taught me that voting is not a right; it’s a duty.

Two thoughts:

1. Not voting is a vote, perversely, mayhap, but still a vote, a vote to abdicate your responsibility to care about your neighbors, your community, and your polity.

An election at whatever level of government is not about you. It’s about the polity. Abandon it, you abandon the polity.

2. Vote in the real world, because that’s the world where we live–vote not in a fantasy world where perfection is likely or even attainable.

If you choose to vote for someone who doesn’t have a chance of winning, you are choosing option #1, but just dressing it up in Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes to make it seem palatable, but it’s merely a seeming. Behind the seeming is cowardice, fear to take a stand that matters, fear, indeed, to matter.

Your vote is your opportunity to influence. Use it wisely.

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03 November 2016 · Comments Off on Trickle-on Economics · Categories: Political Economy

Title:  The Sun Is Shining in Kansas.  Image:  Drunk in alley passed out on teabagger tax cuts as the sun of reality shines  on his misery.

Click to see the image at its original location.

Michael Hiltzik surveys the ruin:

How bad is the situation in Kansas? So bad that in August 2015, the Brownback administration stopped publishing a semi-annual report of the state’s economy online; henceforth, members of the public have to make a special request for the document.

Follow the link for details.

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03 November 2016 · Comments Off on Nothing To Do, Nowhere To Go · Categories: Political Economy

Still well under 300k.

Jobless claims increased by 7,000 to 265,000 in the week ended Oct. 29, a Labor Department report showed Thursday in Washington.

(snip)

Filings for unemployment benefits have been below 300,000 for 87 straight weeks — the longest streak since 1970 and a level typical for a healthy labor market. . . . .

The four-week average of claims, a less-volatile measure than the weekly figure, increased to 257,750 from 253,000 in the prior week.

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits dropped by 14,000 to 2.03 million in the week ended Oct. 22.

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27 October 2016 · Comments Off on Nothing To Do, Nowhere To Go · Categories: Political Economy

Still not bad.

Jobless claims declined by 3,000 to 258,000 in the week ended Oct. 22, a Labor Department report showed Thursday in Washington.

(snip)

The four-week average of claims, a less-volatile measure than the weekly figure, increased to 253,000 from 252,000 in the prior week.

The number of people continuing to receive jobless benefits dropped by 15,000 to 2.04 million in the week ended Oct. 15. The unemployment rate among people eligible for benefits held at 1.5 percent. These data are reported with a one-week lag.

The really big news, left implicit but unstated in Bloomberg’s story, is that Bloomberg’s experts got it right. Today’s the day I buy that lottery ticket!

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